Vintage Film Sets Of The Golden Era

Acclaimed Hollywood makes stand apart because of their detailed visuals, engaging plots and raw images. The dedication to originality sworn by the classics remains unparalleled in modern cinema.

Vintage film sets were a major reason why classics of the Golden Era are uncontested examples of quality and excellence till date.

Regardless of the progress being made in cinematography techniques, some attributes can exclusively be found on film sets of the classics only. A lot that went into the making of a record-breaking blockbuster was forgotten because it was a behind-the-scenes occurrence.

Here are some interesting reminders about what happened on the sets of classic movies.

Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974)

The horror classic released in 1974 was a successful hit that left many shivering with terror at the cringe-worthy explicitness of violence. If making the movie a living horror was Tobe Hooper’s aim, he surely succeeded in achieving that.

For the most part, the crude reality of some of the stunts staged in the movie can be attributed to the fact that they were actually real! The antics that were performed on set were not as far from reality as one might assume. For instance, the movie actor Gunnar Hansen was under the influence of drugs while performing the iconic stunt with a chainsaw! The movie ends with a scene where Hansen cuts a door open with a chainsaw while having no control over his motor skills because he was high.

It is a blessing that he didn’t aim for his own limb instead of the door! Here is a hint for all those wondering how exactly the director was able to make a movie which served justice to the realness of gore.

The Charge Of The Light Brigade (1936)

The bloodbath that resulted in the Crimean War was recreated in a film in 1936. The scene where British cavalry raced on their horses towards the Russian artillery was a suicidal moment of the war. Needless to say this stunt cost the British army scores of martyred soldiers and war horses.

Since the sight of slaughtered men and horses was an iconic memory of this historic moment, Warner Brothers vouched to serve justice to this event with due dedication to authenticity. Therefore, in order to capture a shot of dead horses which was as close to real as possible, they killed as many horses as would suffice to shoot an authentic representation. Record states an estimate of 125 horses were piled on top of each other after being made to serve the purpose of the classic.

All debates aside, this evidence is proof of the extent to which filmmakers were willing to go in order to earn the title of Classic for their production.

The Ten Commandments (1923)

Cecil B. DeMille’s work ethics observed in most of his movies were perfectly aligned with the true spirit of industrious Christians who didn’t dare to involve anything vicious in their work and prayers for the fear of God.

The Telegraph has reported that during the shooting of The Ten Commandments (1923), DeMille had an extensive film set made in the California desert. Not only was the whole production crew required to live on set, but also follow strict rules of avoiding any ungodly behavior. Activities as minor as playing cards or as abominable as drinking were prohibited on the set.